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After shots

So they had to wait a little, but here are my dyed Hedera socks:
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They are just dyed with three different colors of Kool-Aid (black cherry, orange and a little grape), but although the dye job isn’t completely even, it is color-fast. I like them a lot better now than in their pre-dyed state.
In other news, since I don’t think I’ve said so, the Hedera pattern is really lovely. I especially like the heel pattern and the high heel flap. In the pattern, it is about 50 rows high. In the Monkeys I’m knitting now I’m going down to 40-44 (still taller than what’s in the original Monkeys pattern), and even that leaves comfortable room for my high arches.

The Monkeys should be done in a day or two. Can’t wait to show them off properly.

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Teacher presents: We hope you’ll stay warm this holiday season

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The fabric is leftover black wool bouclé felt from my dress. The embroidery yarn is cotton.

New sock

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I honestly can’t decide which I like better: the pattern (Monkey by Cookie A.), the yarn (Dream in Color Smooshy, colourway In vino veritas, bought as a souvenir at Brooklyn General Store) or the eye of partridge heel I substituted in. This project is a delight, unfortunately. Unfortunately, because I promised my daughter my next project would be new mittens for her. Good thing it’s been pretty warm around here these last few days.

I definitely need to get more DIC yarn. But maybe get cracking on those mittens first.

Hedera completed

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My long-suffering Hedera socks, started in December 2007(!) are finally finished. They have been languishing in a WIP bag lo these many years, but after I picked them back out a week ago to have some knitting on our road trip to New York, I have knit one toe (twice) and one whole sock. I reknit the toe because I could not figure out how to graft the toe shut. After several frustrating attempt ended in several unintended purl stitches, I gave it up and ended it like a round toe. Gave me some more wriggle room, too, so it worked out well. I really hate the colour of the yarn, which may have contributed to the length of time involved. As I write, my new Hedera are taking a bath with some black cherry, orange and grape Kool-Aid. After pictures to come! In the meantime, a couple more before shots:

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What you can do on a two-week road trip

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Five dish cloths. The bottom left square is – hopefully – the start of a fully handspun patchwork blanket. Knitting ten squares and spinning enough yarn for another ten will be my Tour de Fleece project.

Summer cardigan

Now that I’m a couple of weeks into my first summer here in DC, I’m beginning to realise the folly of knitting a summer cardigan for this climate. But I didn’t know that in March, when I started this project. I had stopped by Looped Yarnworks, and they had quite a lot of Rowan Summer Tweed at 40 % off. I wanted to knit a quick and easy summer cardigan. I have loved my February Lady Sweater, so I figured the same pattern would do the trick for summer as well. I love Rowan Summer Tweed in finished projects, but knitting it is surprisingly annoying. This yarn has an unbelievable amount of veg matter in it, I had to pause every couple of stitches to pull out an embedded bit of straw.

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And it does! I have worn it a couple of times – we had about a week of cool weather (by which I mean temperatures that would have Norwegians flocking to the beach) where it was perfect.

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I’m very pleased with it. Looking at the pictures now, I’m beginning to wonder whether I should have knit the sleeves another inch or two longer, but I’m very happy with the length when I wear it. In order to avoid the silk growing with wear (a tendency which could only be exacerbated by the garter stitch in the yoke), I reinforced the neckline with elastic lace hem tape. It has the benefit of stretching exactly enough to lie flat even on a raglan yoke, but still providing enough structure to keep the silk and cotton from stretching into an off-the-shoulder style cardie. Also, it looks pretty when it peeps out if I wear it open.

I guess thanks are due to Looped Yarnworks, not only for discounting the yarn, but also for having lots of customers willing to advise me on the buttons to go with the cardigan. I had it narrowed down to three different types when the customers at Looped unanimously supported the light wooden ones.

Quick, cheap and easy

Impulse buy at Beadazzled:

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A few minutes’ work:

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Total cost: $9.14


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